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FBI has ’free rein’ in Kavanaugh investigation

FBI has ’free rein’ in Kavanaugh investigation

The investigation comes after Christine Blasey Ford, a northern California professor, alleged that Kavanaugh attempted to rape her at a high school gathering in the 1980s.

President Donald Trump initially opposed such an investigation in the face of sexual misconduct claims against Kavanaugh, but the president and Senate Republican leaders agreed to an inquiry after Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona made clear he would not vote to confirm Kavanaugh without one.

Kavanaugh has called her accusations a "joke" and Judge said he "categorically" denies the allegations.

Sanders said on "Fox News Sunday" that the White House is "not micromanaging this process" but also said an open-ended probe into Swetnick's claims and whether Kavanaugh may have misled lawmakers in his Senate Judiciary Committee testimony would not be acceptable. But shortly after Trump's denial, the New York Times confirmed that the White House has provided the FBI a list of witnesses it can interview and is restricting the scope of the investigation.

But Coons said Kavanaugh, testifying last Thursday at the Senate Judiciary Committee, delivered more partisan lines, including that the accusations were revenge by the Clintons and a smear campaign carried out by Democrats upset with Trump's 2016 election win.

NBC news had reported on significant limitations on the scope of the FBI's investigation, including barring investigation of claims of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh brought forth by Julie Swetnick.

Deborah Ramirez's lawyer, John Clune, said Saturday that agents want to interview Ramirez, who has alleged that Kavanaugh exposed himself to her at a party in the early 1980s.

A senior Republican leadership aide told CNN that the first key procedural vote on the Senate floor on Kavanaugh's nomination would be no later than October 5 and could happen sooner if the FBI wraps up its investigation before then. "Actually, I want them to interview whoever they deem appropriate, at their discretion".

Female voices have echoed throughout the U.S. Senate this week demanding male senators justify their support for Brett Kavanaugh's U.S. Supreme Court nomination despite an allegation of high school sexual assault.

She expressed sympathy for Ford, but said Kavanaugh deserved protection, too.

Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, said the parameters of the probe are based on the wishes of three wavering colleagues - Sens. It also reported that the White House had provided a list of witnesses the Federal Bureau of Investigation was allowed to interview. But if they really cared about a true investigation, Comey said there wouldn't be an alarm on the investigation.

"Look at me when I'm talking to you", one woman cried as Flake stood uncomfortably in the elevator. "They should be looking at anything they think is credible within this limited scope". Republicans say reopening the FBI investigation is unnecessary because committee members have had the opportunity to question both Kavanaugh and Ford and other potential witnesses have submitted sworn statements.

Flake later insisted on the FBI investigation to secure his vote allowing Kavanaugh's nomination to move out of the Judiciary Committee. "The FBI, this is what they do".

Kavanaugh and Ford, who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when both were teenagers, testified publicly before the Judiciary Committee on Thursday. "If I was unjustly accused, that's how I would feel, as well", Flake said. "I'm a victim of sexual assault", she said.

"Republicans have to ask themselves if they're willing not only to sell the soul of the party, but sell their own souls to get this particular conservative on the Supreme Court", Horn said in an interview. "You're telling me that my assault doesn't matter, that what happened to me doesn't matter and you're going to elect people who do these things into power". "They have to make sure that this is a credible investigation from beginning to end".

"The Senate is dictating the terms", she said.